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. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
republicans are also pushing a bill that would also change the state's rules for electing a president. based on the congressional maps that virginia republicans gerrymandered back in 2012. so the same maps they have created to give themselves permanent majority, permanent victories in nonstatewide elections, they would also use those maps now to allocate virginia's electoral votes for president of the united states. essentially, rigging the presidential vote in virginia, using the exact same means that they have already used to rig the state level votes for republicans in virginia. we are hearing talk about republican plans to change the rules and thus rig the presidential in a bunch of states now. these are all states that tend to support democrats for president, but where republicans now control the state house, and the governorship. and they think they might be able to use that local republican control to change the rules by which those states contribute electoral votes for the presidency. this has very quietly and very quickly become one of the most important political stories in the cou
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
scheme for the presidential election in their state in time for 2016. the republican governor and the majority leader in the senate have ball said that they support that idea for pennsylvania. the beltway is supposedly fixated on elections and election process, but here is an election process story that could use some beltway fixation. if you want to look into a yourself, we have built a tool kit of links on the story at our web site. thanks for being with us tonight. it's time for the last word with loans or adonal. have a great night. >> the assailant had a 100 clip magazine. now had his weapon not jammed, got knows how many more people would have been killed. in newtown, some of those children were riddled with # 1 11 bullet holes in a first grader. high-capacity magazines are our view are not worth the risk [ applause ] >> vice president biden then explained why this time is different. there are some who say why the most powerful voice in this debate belongs to those to save lives. i think they are wrong. this time, this time will not be like times that have come before. n
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. elp protecth as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation thro
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
's rick nolan first got elected. then he took a hiatus for 30 years. now he's back with a lot to say about what's changed. he is sort of everything is old is new again in our meet the new members series. the white house unveils the president's official portrait for the next four years. wait until you get a closer look at the toll of the last four on him. good morning from washington. it's friday, january 18th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. our final "daily rundown" of the obama first term. right to my first reads of the morning. if 2009 was all about hope, 2013 may be about the ability to cope. so says one of our pollsters. if it is possible americans have grown more pessimistic about their leaders in washington and, worse, they think those leaders are now hurting the economy. as president obama prepares to be sworn in for a second term our new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll shows a lagging economy and partisan battles are sa sapping the public confidence replacing the buoyant mood of four years ago with more pessimism now about the future of the country even as t
for putting out an ad like that. the children of elected officials should be off the table. they shouldn't be part of the debate. they haven't proposed these new rules and new proposals, rather, new initiatives. the president has. and he's fair game, but his kids aren't. with respect to what i've said about the congress, they need to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. they need to get off their duff with their 12% rating and understand the reason why they have the kind of approval rating that they do today is because they haven't done enough to work across the aisle. look, this is an area that -- where there could and should be bipartisan support for sensible legislation. universal background checks, there shouldn't be a disagreement about that. better federal state, local coordination. there shouldn't be a debate about that. there are things that we can do and move forward and things that the congress should do. that's what the people of this country expect them to do. >> los angeles mayor antonio villaraigo villaraigosa. >>> we have aaron blake, political reporter for the "
with us for this hour. the 1992 presidential election. that was the election that cut short poppy bush's time in office, right? he was only a one-term president because he lost in 1992. democrats like to remember 1992 as a triumphant year for the democratic party because there was this young arkansas democratic governor bill clinton unseating an incumbent republican president. the uncomfortable part of that memory for democrats is that even though bill clinton did beat president bush in 1992 he did so with only 43% of the vote. bill clinton got 43% of the vote that year. president bush got 37% of the vote. and even though it is always a bad idea to do math on television, this one isn't that hard. if you add up 43 and 37 you do not get anywhere near 100% of the vote. what happened to the rest of the vote? the wacky thing about the 1992 election in terms of thinking about american binary red versus blue party politics is that another guy who ran that year, a third person, got almost 20% of the vote. it was ross perot, right? giant sucking sound. ross perot got a very large proportion of
that make this country great. >> i saw that as essentially sort of a bottom line on the election that got him to this day. >> yes. >> maybe a signal about what is to come in terms of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an exclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. ta talking about stonewall in
elected members of the congress, only 27 of the new republican house members showed up. that's out of a record freshman class that totaled 87. more recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is hoping it spills over to the next four years and both sides of the aisle make a move to be more social and more civil. and, hence, more productive. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz, starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome "the ed show" from new york. republicans are raising the white flag. this is "the ed show."
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
, democratic senator chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." welcome to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially under way, this debate is well under way. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish with comprehensive gun control. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that, of course, lapsed in 2004, and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne la pierre of the nra on this program very hard when this initially came up, i challenge you as well with the question of is this really going to make a difference? and rich lowry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
, planning and shown in the past election and maybe more so this time, to put tens of millions of dollars on behalf of gun control against candidates, couldn't this challenge the national rifle association, its influence? >> it's ironic that bloom berg is doing that. when you compare new york city to chicago, which is headed for a record number of homicides, new york city recorded the lowest homicides since 1960 ace, that's effective policing by the new york police department. and if michael bloomberg would put more into policing, chicago, st. louis, it would be better spent. >> paul: it's a challenge for the nra political clout. we'll see who wins. >> as president obama prepares to be sworn for for his second term, what is he hoping to accomplish? we know that guns are on the agenda, but from immigration ♪ ♪ pop goes the world pop in a whole new kind of clean th tide pods. just one pac has the stain removal power of six caps of the bargain brand. pop in. stand out. of six caps of the bargain brand. living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joi
directly to the goals of the more diverse and more social coalition that re-elected him. for the first time in an inaugural speech, explicitly mentioning gay rights. >> if we are truly created equal, the love we give one another must be equal, as well. >> reporter: he spoke about climate change, equal pay for women and immigration reform. >> our journey is not complete until we find a way to welcome the thriving, hopeful immigrants who see america as a land of opportunity. >> reporter: the president paused during many of the day's special moments, seeming to take it all in, knowing this would be his last inauguration. some republicans thought president obama's speech was too partisan. with divided government here in washington, he will need some gop support to pass his big agenda items. rob? paula? >> all right. tahman bradley live in washington. we had breaking news that part of the president's second term is going to get you a new hat. >> reporter: stop that. it's warm, though, okay? >> that's all that matters. >> easy for us to say, warm in the studio. >> he's doing the hard work. thank
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they're worried about their elections. i think that in the center of the country and the red states where these senators are running, they don't think that the president's message works, and they're going to try to move themselves away from that because they're worried about it. they're worried about all these -- >> we're talking about the majority of the country though. if the majority is with the president, is he too liberal? that's what i'm asking. can you call the guy too left when he's right where the middle is? how can you keep saying that? it's the only question i want to put to you. if more than 50% support equality of marriage, more than 50% support a woman's right to choose, if more than 50% are with him on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example,
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
and i think generally speaking i think keep kids of ehe lektlek elected officials out of politics, do you agree. >> i agree. >> sean: but i mentioned major hasan and it didn't fit in the narrative. >> anytime you use children in any context, it's a dicey proposition and you have to be careful and the president and his children are in a different category. >> sean: i thought it was creepy and exploited. >> and you use the children in campaign ads and certainly in 2008 with joint interviews with michelle and so on. he also used at least one child when he signed obamacare, the health care bill into law so he has been known to use children as props. the reason today was different in this particular case, sean, because you're dealing with an issue that involves violence and especially violence against children, so to have those children there and to sort of drape himself in it, is sort of cynical. how can you argue against children? you can't. >> sean: one of the things that bothers me the most in this leslie, we rightly protect our presidents, our mayors, our cabinet officials, hollywood
of the national elections we've been saying it more strenuously and more strongly. the bulk of the republican party seems not to be listening, as you just pointed out. they call it a communications problem or they call it a -- we're just not getting the really hard core message of the republican party across. i'm afraid they are getting that message across. and that message is continuitin intolerance for women, minorities, lgbt community and for others who don't, you know, measure up to the mitt romney image of the other percent, the 47% that doesn't count is what republicans simply don't appeal to. >> are they on their way to being a regional party? >> i think they're on their way to committing suicide, very frankly. this has happened before in our history where an existing party has either morphed into another or died and this might just be happening again. if they don't adjust the way they're looking at the rest of this country, if they don't adjust some of their very platform principles, they're done. they're finished. we can put a fork in them. they're toast. i hate to see that. because
. thank you. democrats meeting here in washington re-elected florida congresswoman debbie waserman schultz as the chairwoman. teaming officials concern they will name the fundraising bundleer henry munoz iii of san antonio as the finance chair. officials in texas say three people were wounded in shooting at a community college north of houston. it happened at the north harris campus of the lone star college system. authorities say a fight between two people, one a stunt, led to gunfire. both were wounded and hospitalized. maintenance man was caught in the crossfire and wounded. fourth person was hospitalized. one report said that person may have suffered a heart attack. 40 years ago today, right for abortion was established with the roe v. wade case. shannon bream has more on where we are now. >> the issue of the roe v. wade opinion 40 years ago does little to settle the debate over abortion. pro-life advocates have tange their fight to the state level where the legislators across the country enacted numerous laws aimed to rolling back roe, sparking battles over required ultra sounds and r
heard was sitting in his office saying what do you think politician's x are in the next election and you hear this spontaneous analysis that was always very deep and comprehensive so he has a kind of feel for what it's going to take to close the deal. i think one of the things that's been tough for him is that as he likes to say, this isn't your grandfather's congress so he's getting used to the tea party. >> but he's good at it. he's got this joe, everybody per so that. people like him. a lot of politicians the public meets. they're in awe and they honor the person. >> like the governor of connecticut into that's not the case. but. >> people come away and genuinely like him and that's a skillset and cal he want and a communication's ability and that's very important to this administration and i -- by the way, there's this other thing about him. you can't keep him down. you really can't put him in a room and not hear him. so he's a force and why not use him? >> i also think that, you know, i no ewe're not bog to get into the tea leaves about 2016 but the vice president is not someone tha
. and on a totally legitimate issue. >> i think it is ridiculous that members of our elect, members of our congress are hiding behind this theory that we haven't defined what an assault weapon is. a bush master weapon is an assault weapon. people in the military say those are the kinds of guns we use when we are fighting wars. >> i think it was interesting that david keeb de n defends it saying it has the ability to fire off a lot of rounds quicklism so it would be in convenient to ban it. can you imagine how long it would take to have to change magazine clips? >> my mission for these segments that we are doing is to get one truth straight in each segment. let's get it straight that what rubio said is wrong. that what the president is proposing would have changed the outcome, yes the crazy kid would have stolen his mother's gun but his mother would have not been able to obtain the gun and we would not have had 26 tragedies inside that school. he would not have been able to kill that many kids and teachers. >> absolutely. they go after the weapons, the ammunition and the screening which like so many
democrats in line. many of them are up for re-election in 2014. potentially vulnerable. montana senator max baucus responded to the senate in a statement, quote, before passing new laws, we need a debate that respects responsible, law-abiding gun owners in montana instead of a one-size-fits-all directives from washington. joe manchin said, quote, i'm disappointed the president did not recommend the creation of a national commission on mass violence that i have proposed. a national commission can build the consensus we need for real action, backed not only by gun control advocates, mental health experts and entertainment industry executives but also by law-abiding gun owners. >>> the white house is worried that if this fight becomes too much about the assault weapons ban, and not enough about measures, which are more politically possible, they'll have a problem. they want to keep people focused on fights they can win. background checks, things like that. republicans have unsurprisingly responded negatively, including florida senator marco rubio. >> by the own admission of the white house, wh
? paul ryan was the guy who lost the last election because most americans didn't like his budget ideas in the first place. but now ryan claims voters actually didn't reject republican principles. ryan told "the wall street journal" we have to do a better job of explaining why we think our ideas are better for everybody and why they're better for fighting poverty. paul ryan wants us to believe that he can fight poverty, pay off the debt and balance the budget in a new number, now ten years. do you believe that? i got some swampland for you down in florida if you do. let's do some quick math here. analysts say ryan will have to cut about $800 billion in federal spending, including defense. that's 22% of the federal budget. so ryan would have to cut spending by one-fifth in ten years. those cuts go way beyond anything paul ryan suggested during the campaign. his old plan balanced the budget in 30 years. but he still wanted to cut programs for the poor by 62%. ryan's old budget would have slashed federal medicaid funding by almost a third. paul ryan's new budget plan will have to be leaner
of one. i'm waiting for others to come out who are still elected representatives of the party. one, to say hey, let's have a real conversation here and not just hide behind the nra and its rhetoric of fear. >> michael, do you think there are any republicans that will vote for any of the proposals that were put on the table today? >> i do. and i'll tell you why. it's the numbers that you show in the first segment today, those poll numbers. that's where the rubber meets the road here. it's a turning point and one that the party better get in front of. >> at this point in time, the only gop voice we are really hearing are the crazy ones. so you might be right, michael, susan, any other republicans who are out there. but as the debate is being framed, we don't see any real republicans in leadership positions taking a moderate -- >> michael, i hope you're correct. >> the obama campaign apparatus is going to take on the nra. we'll ask if the president will hit the road to make his case directly to the american people. then find out how survivors are reacting to the president's plan. sand
: big election day today. voting is underway in israel for the country's next leader, current prime minister benjamin netanyahu voting today. expected to win re-election but with a smaller majority than in 2009. results are expected in this afternoon and we will have them for you live whether they happen. bill: in our country now the president setting up the next round of big budget battles. mr. obama defending the role of government in reaffirming support for major entitlement programs, the drivers of her debt like medicare, medicaid and social security, leaving many to wonder if any of d.c.'s spending will decrease. in fact democratic senator chuck schumer already suggesting that taxes may need to go up again to pay for all those bills and all that spending. stephen hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard", and fox news contributor has been on this. steve, good morning to you. how are you doing, post inauguration day? >> doing well. bill: give us a sense about what we can expect to happen in your town next. >> well, i think very little. you're looking at a spending, spending trend
the president won the election. >> reporter: but republicans on capitol hill are not voting to raise the debt ceiling without getting something in return. they say in order to approve a highe debt limit, they want senate democrats to do something they haven't done in four years -- pass a budget. >> for us to have a debate about spending and debt, we've got to have the focus be on a budget and what we're going to do to achieve a balanced budget over time. >> reporter: senate democrats view the vote as an opportunity to raise more money for taxes. >> it's going to be a great opportunity for us. in our budget we lift budget reform which many of my republican colleagues like, but it's going to include revenues. >> reporter: the house is expected to approve the debt limit increase tomorrow. no dollar amount specifically is in the bill, but the legislation is expected to keep the country paying its bills through mid-may. anne-marie? >> susan mcginnis in washington, thank you very much. >>> the president has also addressed the struggle for equality in this country and broke some
, michelle. >>> there once was a name barack whose re-election came as a shock, he raised taxes i pay and then turned marriage gay and now he's coming after your glock. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs morning news." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. on the morning after a very long inauguration day. >> that's right, d.c. police say more than 800,000 people came to the national mall to see president obama's swearing in. thousands of them stayed around to join the president for the inaugural parties last night, bill plante is at the white house. bill good morning. >> reporter: good morning, and good morning out west. the first event on this morning after happens in this hour the president and vice president and their wives attend the national prayer service. last night, the east room of the white house was the place for the hottest afterparty in town. entertainers like kelly clarkson and john legend, lots of politicians, friends of the president, all after the two official inaugural balls. >> my dance partner, michelle obama. >
% of the members. they're sick and tired of getting elected to go up to washington, do their job, sit on committees, work through bills that come through their committees, and then take those bills to the house floor, the senate floor, vote on them, then go to conference. i joked before, it was a lot like, you know, i'm just a bill. "schoolhouse rock." that doesn't happen anymore. americans don't realize that you always end up with a couple of people behind closed doors in the back -- we were on the hill yesterday. i heard this complaint from republicans, from democrats, from senators, from congressmen and congresswomen. they all say the same thing. we don't get to do our jobs. they come up here and in the end it's always the president and john boehner in a back room, and we just sit around. >> so much of the disillusionment you hear from members who feel they're going to make a difference is exactly what you're talking about. and so much of the infighting is really not so much between the parties, while there's plenty of that, there is such a frustration between house and senate. they openly knock
at the bit. sitting at the edge of the seats. they want to elect women. i see that here in my race in new york city and women are ready. when you see the debt crisis, we need more women in office and washington to simply get things right. >> we need more women in washington and in office. i totally agree with you. we won't end up, steve, with an all white male democratic primary. i want to see a female president. i want to caution against knowing what a mind will do because of the body attached to it. are we assuming that every woman politician is great for woman? what an a woman anti-feminism, anti-choice, would we almost that? >> 2016! >> female equivalent of what clarence thomas is for black people? we won't want that. we want a politician good for women's issues as much as a woman to break that barrier. >> can i just say, poor joe biden? everyone is clamoring for hillary to win. he is the current vice president. and if she doesn't now, democrats are saying, who else can we find? i'd be like, i'm right here, people. look at me. can't catch a break. >> thank you for being with us. >> th
. the president, since the election, has talked to 50 ceos and other business leaders. they've had 300 small business leaders come into the white house. this is all part of valerie jarrett's empire. she says she'll be doing more of that in the days ahead to get both immigration and a gun-control package passed this year. >> mike, always interesting in any two-term presidency, who stays all eight years at the staff level? what's your prediction? will valerie still till the end? >> she will. we asked her about the post-presidency. she joked she hopes the president will spend a lot of time in hawaii, that she'll probably go back to chicago. she also said that in the next few -- she also said in the president's inaugural address, he's going to take a hopeful tone and he's going to talk to every citizen about the role that they have to play in the agenda that he has for the next couple years. >> boy, that's going to take a lot of time, talk to every citizen. >> not just the 53%. >> mike allen, thanks very much. >>> still ahead, chuck todd, eugene robinson and david gregory, and we're going to be
this would look right before the election, they denied it over at homeland security and categorically denied it and now ap says it has the internal documents to prove it. and joining me is the chief counsel for the center of law and justice. this story, it's hard to get your arms around how many things went wrong here, we have an illegal immigrant who is a child molester, who is volunteering in the office of a u.s. senator and first, the senator's office says, well, we didn't know any of that because he was unpaid, so we never checked the social security number. there was no way for us to know is what they say. let's table that for now and talk about the fact that it appears no one other than the associated press, now judicial watch and i guess senator chuck grassley has taken interest thanks to the ap. >> right. >> megyn: where is the inspector general, the white house, the administration to try to see whether this actually happened? >> yeah, nowhere to be found is the answer to that and i think that what senator grassley did in his letter and request, as well as judicial watch in their doc
. >> my colleague and i went to chicago. this was in the midst of the election and picked up opposition research prepared by jack ryan, obama's onetime republican senate point. he found all this information. the way he frames it, and i think it's probably right, is that obama was always very soft on crime but very tough on guns. every time obama had a crime vote to take when he was in the illinois state senate, he always voted "present" because he didn't want to -- for two reasons. one, he said that criminal law disproportionately affected african-americans. he saw a racial component there. additionally, he said i don't want to clog the court system with all these cases. what do you want to clog the court system with? we thought given his rhetoric on guns lately it would be interesting to bring up this vote where he said i don't want to give tougher prosecution to children who shoot in schools. >>steve: you look at chicago, one of the murder capitals of the world. nothing the president proposed the other day would crack down on handgun violence in chicago. there is one other thing we wa
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